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Telephoto lens

Posted by on Oct 6th, 2013 in Photo Gear, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Telephoto lens

A telephoto lens is any lens that magnifies the subject, i.e. a lens longer than 85mm. Telephoto lenses are divided into further subtypes, namely: medium telephoto lenses and super telephoto lenses. Beginner tip A telephoto lens is a necessity for wildlife photography. It will open a whole new world to you because you will be able to photograph animals at a distance and yet still fill the frame with the subject. Rather buy one good telephoto lens than try to cover the whole range with a number of mediocre lenses. Pro tip In our opinion, the...

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Balancing the white

Posted by on Sep 20th, 2013 in Photo Capture, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Balancing the white

White balance refers to the colour temperature setting of your camera. Beginner tip Use the automatic white balance setting. Today’s cameras are very accurate when it comes to white balance. If your camera makes a mistake, you can always fix it on the computer (just remember that if you want to change the colours significantly, it is always better to shoot in RAW). Pro tip We never move the white balance setting from automatic. In post-processing we look at the colour values of the whites and greys in the image and make sure that they don’t...

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Wide angle lens

Posted by on Sep 6th, 2013 in Photo Gear, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Wide angle lens

A wide angle lens is any lens shorter than 50mm. If you attach a wide angle lens to your camera, everything will look smaller than the reality. A wide angle lens is used mostly for landscapes and scenery. Beginner tip Don’t be intimidated by other people’s big lenses. Sometimes it is better to use a wide angle lens – even when photographing wildlife. Pro tip Most professional photographers own an ultra wide angle zoom lens, i.e. 14-24mm or 16-35mm f2.8. This is an extremely useful lens, for with it you can distort reality and make most scenes...

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Quality of natural light

Posted by on Aug 30th, 2013 in Photo Lighting, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Quality of natural light

Light quality is critical in order to get an exceptional image – especially when you are photographing static animals and taking portraits. No light is sensually more pleasing than the light of the so-called golden hours. Golden hours for golden images There are two golden hours in any sunny day – the first and the last. These are times when the light is warm and soft, and usually when the best photographs are taken. Don’t miss them. Beginner tip Most things are beautiful in the golden hours. So if the light is exceptional, don’t be picky...

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Contrasting light – the no-go zone

Posted by on Aug 22nd, 2013 in Photo Lighting, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Contrasting light – the no-go zone

The light during the middle of a sunny day in Africa is often too contrasting for photography. If you try to photograph under these circumstances, the light will appear harsh and the shadows will appear as black holes in the image. Follow the example of the animals and take a siesta during the middle of the day. Beginner tip A photograph taken in the middle of the day is almost always doomed not to be as you expected it to be. There is no camera or lens on earth that can fix bad light. Lighting tip The only time when you can photograph in...

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Aperture priority is the priority

Posted by on Aug 13th, 2013 in Photo Capture, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Aperture priority is the priority

The most practical shooting mode for nature photography is one of the semi-automatic modes: Program, Aperture Priority or Shutter Priority. Beginner tip If you are only starting out, don’t worry too much about the exposure settings on the camera: concentrate on taking beautifully composed images. However, stay away from the completely automatic settings. Aim at using Aperture Priority as soon as you can – it is the way to go. Pro tip We almost always have our cameras set on Aperture Priority. If we want to achieve a certain shutter speed, we...

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Medium telephoto lens

Posted by on Aug 10th, 2013 in Photo Gear, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Medium telephoto lens

A medium telephoto lens is a lens between 85mm and 200mm. Beginner tip The first lens you should purchase to take wildlife photographs with is a medium telephoto lens. If your budget allows, buy a lens that is fast, i.e. f2.8 or f4. With a fast lens, you can use a 1.4x or 2x tele-converter on the lens, making it even stronger. A typical lens in this range is a 70-200 f2.8 or f4, or a 75-300 f5.6. Pro tip The most utilized lens in our camera bag for nature photography is the 70-200mm f2.8 lens. It is the most versatile one for wildlife...

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Camera – the time freezer

Posted by on Aug 6th, 2013 in Photo Gear, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Camera – the time freezer

It can slice through time – even the hardest of times. It can fuel memories. It can freeze anything – even fire. Cameras for all types Digital cameras come in four types: point-and-shoot, advanced compact, single-lens reflex (SLR) and camera phone. Beginner tip When buying a camera, make sure that it will meet your creative needs in the near future. And remember that you get what you pay for. Don’t expect your phone to take better photographs than an SLR camera. Also decide early on what brand you want to use, because to change camera brands...

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Standard lens – boring or brilliant?

Posted by on Oct 30th, 2012 in Photo Gear, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Standard lens – boring or brilliant?

A standard lens is 50mm and a standard zoom lens is typically 35-70mm. These are the lenses usually sold with SLR cameras. The magnification perspective of a standard lens is the closest to that of the human eye. Beginner tip Use the lens that came with the camera. Although it cannot zoom into the action, it is very useful for showing the animal in the environment. Pro tip A 50mm fixed lens is a handy lens to have and you can get a very fast 50mm at reasonably low cost. They are wonderful in poor light and very compact. Photographs taken with...

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Graduated neutral density (ND) filter – the leveller

Posted by on Jul 16th, 2012 in Photo Gear, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 1 comment

Graduated neutral density (ND) filter – the leveller

A graduated neutral density filter is a filter that is half dark and half clear. It can normally be attached to the front of the lens with a lens holder, so that the position of the filter can be changed relative to the lens. Graduated ND filters are used to eliminate contrasts that are too high for the camera to capture, like a bright sky with a dark scene. Pro tip Although it is easy these days to change the brightness of part of an image in post-production, a graduated ND filter still comes in handy in overcast conditions. It brings out...

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Featured Photos

Telephoto lens Posted by author icon heinrichvdb Oct 6th, 2013 | no responses
Wide angle lens Posted by author icon heinrichvdb Sep 6th, 2013 | no responses
Quality of natural l... Posted by author icon heinrichvdb Aug 30th, 2013 | no responses

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