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Evaluating metering modes

Posted by on Jul 13th, 2012 in Photo Capture, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Evaluating metering modes

A metering mode is the method in which the camera light meter determines the correct exposure. You can generally choose between multi-zone, partial, spot or centre-weighted metering modes. The difference between multi-zone and the rest is that with this setting the camera uses its brain. Multi-zone is also referred to as matrix, evaluative, honeycomb or segment metering. Beginner tip Your camera will be set to multi-zone as a default. Keep it there. Pro tip There are different ways of applying metering modes in difficult lighting conditions....

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When pink starts to dance

Posted by on Apr 23rd, 2012 in Photo Tales, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

When pink starts to dance

The Swakopmund–Walvis Bay area in Namibia is one of the Van den Bergs’ favourite places to photograph. They spent some time there photographing for Southern Africa’s Beautiful Deserts – The Big Picture and were after the desert creatures in the dunes behind Swakopmund. One day they decided to drive up to Walvis Bay, passing the town towards the salt works. There, to their delight, they came upon hundreds of flamingoes on the eastern side of the road. Every time they had been there in the past, the flamingoes had kept to the western sea side...

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Depth of field and its expensive price

Posted by on Dec 20th, 2011 in Photo Capture, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Depth of field and its expensive price

Depth of field is determined by the aperture. The bigger the aperture (i.e. the lower the f-stop number), the smaller the depth of field. So if you hope to have only a part of an image in focus, or the background out of focus, use a large aperture, e.g. f2.8. If you want as much as possible in focus, use a small aperture, e.g. f16. The price Everything has its price. If you want more depth of field, you will have to pay in an expensive currency: shutter speed. The smaller the aperture (to get the depth of field), the slower the shutter speed...

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Rest in pieces

Posted by on Dec 14th, 2011 in Photo Tales, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

Rest in pieces

This is a heartbreaking story of a vain, camera-loving grasshopper. Heinrich was driving home after a shoot in Kruger National Park. He drove on a dirt road through a local community just outside the park when he saw this grasshopper in the middle of the road. He stopped, got out of his vehicle and inspected the subject. Evidently the grasshopper didn’t fear him, as it made no attempt to move when he approached. In fact, it seemed to be posing, stretching out its long red legs, trying to seduce him. He took out his 100mm f2.8 macro lens and...

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One day

Posted by on Nov 10th, 2011 in Featured, Photo Tales, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

One day

Life is short. This story is proof of that. Philip and Ingrid were photographing for their book Beautiful Deserts – The Big Picture in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park in South Africa when they witnessed the birth of a springbok. Normally these antelope give birth just after the first rains, but the rains had not yet fallen and this one arrived early – it was the only springbok born in the whole area. While driving along a dry riverbed the Van den Bergs noticed a springbok ewe and at first glance her appearance seemed strange. On closer...

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Dead Vlei disappearance

Posted by on Oct 5th, 2011 in Photo Tales, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 1 comment

Dead Vlei disappearance

If you have ever been to Dead Vlei close to Sossusvlei in Namibia, you will know that it is a place known for two things – haunting trees reaching out from the pale earth and pale tourists reaching for their cameras. There are so many photographs taken of the vlei that it is almost impossible to be original. The emptiness and desolation of the place is so overwhelming that many avid photographers have captured the scenes, only to return home to find images identical to theirs published everywhere. For there are only a few images that one can...

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The dangers and wonders of back lighting

Posted by on Sep 30th, 2011 in Photo Lighting, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 0 comments

The dangers and wonders of back lighting

Back lighting is when the light shines directly towards the photographer from behind the subject. A good back-lit image is one where you can see all the detail in the subject despite the light only coming from behind and not shining directly on it. Beginners tip Only try back lighting if you don’t have any other choice. Using back lighting under the wrong light conditions (when the light is too harsh) is a common mistake among beginners. Try whenever possible to use front lighting. Pro tip The only condition when back lighting will work is...

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Mining for the diamonds of dawn

Posted by on Sep 12th, 2011 in Photo Lighting, Phototips | 0 comments

Mining for the diamonds of dawn

All photographers know about the enchantment of the golden hour. All of us have at least once forced ourselves to wake from the deepest, sweetest dreams of the early morning, to go on a game drive as the sun rises – anything not to miss this beautiful hour. The golden hour is a wonderful time to photograph. Yet lately I have found myself yearning for the 15 minutes before the sun rises. There is no name for this kind of lighting, but it could well be called the ‘diamond dawn’, because the light in those few minutes before...

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The zoo in zoom

Posted by on Aug 31st, 2011 in Photo Capture, Phototips, Principles of Nature Photography | 5 comments

The zoo in zoom

Wildlife photographers go on safari to capture wild animals with their cameras. They use long lenses and zoom in to draw the animal closer, capture it in a rectangular cage, and bring it back home to display to their friends. I have been one of these collectors for many years, obsessively prowling the game reserves to find perfect specimens. And like many others I constantly reached for my biggest calibre lens to capture the animal as tightly in the frame as possible. But one day I realized that to zoom in too much results in zoo-like images....

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To blur or not to blur

Posted by on Aug 18th, 2011 in Photo Capture, Phototips | 4 comments

To blur or not to blur

That is the question. A question that has tormented many wildlife photographers throughout their photographic careers. I for one am still looking for the answer, which is still somewhat blurred. Every wildlife photographer goes through a blurry phase. It normally starts during the final stages of a long trip, when you have photographed a specific subject to death. It is then that you ask yourself – What if? What if you close down your aperture? What would happen if you photograph the subject with a one second exposure? And with that...

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Featured Photos

Telephoto lens Posted by author icon heinrichvdb Oct 6th, 2013 | no responses
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Random Photos

Telephoto lens Posted by author icon heinrichvdb Oct 6th, 2013 | no responses
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Dead Vlei disappeara... Posted by author icon heinrichvdb
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The watchful ostrich Posted by author icon heinrichvdb
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The nutty hippo Posted by author icon heinrichvdb
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